More than 560 businesses from 54 countries, across all sectors and employing 9.5 million with revenues of US$ 4 trillion have called on governments to act now to reverse nature loss. Coinciding with the adoption of the UN General Assembly 75th declaration recognizing the urgent need for Member States to act to protect our planet and build back better, more than half million have joined our voices to urged governments to adopt policies now to reverse nature loss in this decade. We, signatory companies joining the Business for Nature call, recognize and commit to: Healthy societies, resilient economies and thriving businesses rely on nature. Governments must adopt policies now to reverse nature loss in this decade. Together let's protect, restore and sustainably use our natural resources. By signing this call to action members of the business community are hoping governments will hear us and step up their ambition levels in the run-up to Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) COP 15 scheduled to take place in 2021. The new post-2020 global biodiversity framework will be released during the COP 15 CBD in 2021. Join our collective effort by signing the call to action. Here you have further information, as well as the press release and the list of signatories. This list will be announced during key pre-COP15 CBD events in the followind months. Join the call to action Comparte Facebook-f Twitter Linkedin-in ...

Image: Cala Matzoc-Reserva Llevant. Photo by Sebastià Torrens Marilles Foundation, together with the Balearic Center for Applied Biology (CBBA) and Ecoacsa, will calculate the marine natural capital of the Llevant Marine Reserve in Mallorca.The stock of habitats and marine species –our natural capital– generate goods and services for our society. Some of them, such us fisheries or tourism, are visible and can be easily calculated; Others, like the feeling of well-being or enjoyment, are more abstract and difficult to measure. Natural capital accounting makes it possible to visualize the relationship between the natural environment, the economy and human well-being; and it facilitates decision-making by governments and companies for a better conservation of our natural heritage.The objective of the project is to evaluate the contribution of the Marine Reserve of Llevant of fishing interest (to the of Eastern Mallorca) to the local and regional economy, through traditional fishing and leisure activities related to the marine and coastal environment, among others. The aim is to measure the extent, condition and value of the goods and services of the marine reserve and to identify its beneficiaries. Another purpose of the project is to offer data on the benefits obtained (and could be obtained) from investing in the recovery of degraded marine habitats and the conservation of Balearic marine biodiversity. Ultimately, the project wants to make visible the importance of conserving marine ecosystems of the reserve so that the benefits they generate can be sustained in the future.The Balearic Islands have a network of marine reserves and protected areas whose value and benefits have often gone unnoticed. The Marine Reserve of fishing interest of Llevant in Mallorca has been chosen due to the quality of the scientific information available; the history associated with its declaration and the relevance of the participation of the economic sectors involved in its declaration and management; also due to the fact that the reserve is managed jointly and exemplary by the state and autonomous fisheries authorities.As coordinator of Interreg project actions in the Balearic Islands, Marilles Foundation will allocate € 60,000 to carry out the study. The Spanish consultancy Ecoacsa will develop the natural capital accounting system and a guide for its application to other MPAs - with the support of the British consultancy Eftec. The Balearic Center for Applied Biology (CBBA) will carry out field-based work, which will consist of gathering information and perception from local actors.  Image: Detail of a grouper fish.  Foto: Manu San Félix The marine environment provides us multiple benefits: from the fish we eat, to the enjoyment of bathing and diving in the sea. The more we preserve the medium, the more benefits we obtain. Marine protected areas are an excellent tool to guarantee multiple benefits, but we are often not aware of all that they contribute to our economy and society. This project will allow us to better visualize the relationship between a healthy marine environment and economic health and human well-being. Investing in conservation of the marine environment pays off”. Aniol Esteban, Director of Marilles Foundation Share It is very motivating to advance in a field that will undoubtedly provide economic arguments to justify the maintenance and expansion of the resources that MPAs need. We will have useful information for the community of AMP managers in the Balearic Islands. At a minimum, we ensure that the experience reaches 124 organizations that are part of MedPAN managing a total of 110 AMPs in 21 countries. ” Toni Font, Project Coordinator Share The scientific evidence shows that believing that nature will continue to provide us with the goods and services necessary for our prosperity and well-being is no longer sustainable. However, this reality is not perceived at scale and with due interest by a wide spectrum of society. Through this project and the application of the natural capital approach, we tackle the exciting challenge of highlighting the many benefits that MPAs conservation generates for the Balearic society and economy. The health of our marine ecosystems depends on the good health of our homes and businesses. ” David Álvarez, Executive Director of Ecoacsa Share Fortunately, awareness regarding marine environment preservation -reflected in many initiatives, including the AMP declaration- is a concept that has already permeated society. However, there are still many citizens who do not find it profitable to dedicate resources to conserving assets that do not provide direct and tangible benefits. That is why I see this initiative so interesting, because apart from facilitating decision-making to managers responsible to MPAs, it can help convince those skeptics.” Benjamí Reviriego, environmental consultant of CBBA Share What is natural capital? 'Natural capital' takes into account the relationship between natural assets, the services they provide, and the benefits society derives from them. The marine environment provides multiple goods and services to the Balearic society, such as food, climate regulation and multiple recreational opportunities. It is essential to improve knowledge about the values that sea and coasts bring to economy to improve its management and invest the necessary resources to protect it. European project on marine protected areas (MPAs) Despite the increased coverage of MPAs in the Mediterranean, the objective of maintaining marine biodiversity is far from being met. MPAs face many challenges and have multiple deficiencies in the provision of legal instruments and financial resources, which determine the availability of technical and human resources. The Balearic Islands are not an exception in this regard.The objective of the European project Interreg Med MPA Networks it is to contribute to the effective management of Mediterranean MPAs, by proposing solutions in four aspects: effective management, small-scale fisheries management, conservation of mobile species and sustainable financing.Interreg Med MPA is coordinated by MedPAN and brings together ten Mediterranean partners, mainly AMP management bodies from seven countries: Albania, Croatia, France, Greece, Italy, Slovenia and Spain. Marilles Foundation participates as a partner and has the mission of coordinating the implementation of a marine natural capital accounting system in the AMP of  Llevant.Marilles will export the experience of projects on MPAs in the Balearic Islands and other regions of Spain, while importing examples from other parts of the Mediterranean that may be of interest. The results derived from the pilot project in the Llevant will be connected to those obtained in Spain by the project LIFE IP Intemares, by Biodiversity Foundation, which aims to achieve a network of marine spaces of the Natura 2000 Network managed effectively. The recommendations that emerge from this collaborative work will be aimed at supporting policy improvements at international, European and national levels.  Why natural capital accounts are useful Natural capital accounts allow us to have a perspective on the state of our natural capital, its evolution and how its improvement or deterioration affects its ability to continue providing services in the future.This information enables correct decisions to be made, both from public and private institutions, to identify investment priorities, improve management and invest in conservation. All this opens the doors to the possibility of creating a medium and long-term conservation program; a 25-year program, as it has been developed in other countries.Natural assets must be managed in order to obtain products and services. For example, fisheries production depends on marine habitats, the quality of waters and currents, and physical factors that guarantee the life cycle of many species. But it is also necessary the effort of fishermen (human capital), boats and nets (physical capital) and all the services and infrastructure. Image: Fish market. Photo: Marilles Foundation Image: Canoeing in Menorca. Photo: David Arquimbau Press release and photos ...

With the abandonment of traditional agricultural activities, two thirds of the Catalonian territory have ceased to be part of the productive economy. In order to recover natural capital, it is necessary for it to become part of the productive economy again. How can the concept of ecosystem services facilitate opportunities in this area? The cycle "Cyber-forum on ecosystem services and collective intelligence. A way to recover natural capital?" will address this issue. Currently, around a third of the territory of Catalonia is included in the Natura 2000 Network, but its management can be improved; while another third of the Catalonian territorial surface is not productive as a consequence of the traditional abandonment of crops. This means that two thirds of Catalonia need to be properly managed with taxes as the only source of income, and with the public administration as the only administrator. Landscapes with a high natural and cultural value such as the Costa Brava coast are experiencing loss of attractiveness and increased fire risk as a result of this process. Likewise, most of the initiatives promoted from the private sphere encounter legal obstacles and cultural prejudices that see with difficulty the usefulness of the concept of ecosystem services.  How to effectively promote economic activity and biodiversity conservation In order to offer a vision on the viability of private initiatives that promote economic activity and the conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem services the "Cyber-forum on ecosystem services and collective intelligence. A way to recover natural capital? " has been organized by SGM Urban Planning & Ecosystem Services.  Webinar 1: "European vision on ecosystem services" The cycle took place on June 18 at 4:00 p.m. and was moderated by Brigitte Kramer, journalist who collaborates with Süddeutsche Zeitung i Bayerischer newspaper. The first webinar is dedicated to the European vision of the ecosystem services, in which  Mark Rousenvell, Professor of Land Use Change at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Institute of Geography and Geoecology) and head of the IFU´s Land Use Change Research Group will participate. Rosenvell is also co-chair of the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) of the regional assessment for Europe and Central Asia.Paul Mahony, coordinator of the platform OPPLA, a repository of Nature-based Solutions from the European Union that provides a knowledge marketplace for stakeholders, will also participate in the session. Link to video Webinar 2: "Legal obstacles? Is there room for interpretation?" The second webinar that will take place on June 30 at 4:00 p.m. is focused on addressing «Legal obstacles? Is there room for interpretation? ”, with the presence of Pablo Molina, law degree at Pompeu and Fabra University of Barcelona, urban planning technician by the School of Public Administration and partner at J&A Garrigues; and Rafael Fernández, lawyer, Doctor of Law and partner at PwC Spain. Link to video Webinar 3: "Is it possible to earn money and recover natural capital?" The three experts who will share their experience with cyber forum participants on whether "Is it possible to earn money and recover natural capital?" are Agustí Jover, graduated in Economic Sciences from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and founding partner of Promo Assessors Consultors; Miquel Morel, Bachelor of Economics from the UAB, Master of Business Administration from Esade and partner of Promo Assessors Consultors; and David Álvarez, executive director of Ecoacsa and member of the Advisory Board of the European Commission Business @ Biodiversity (platform B@B).  Link to video The webinars are aimed at urban planners (professionals and academics), lawyers, and decision makers and public administration officials. Image: National Park  of Aigüestortes. Source: Pixabay.com Comparte Facebook-f Twitter Linkedin-in ...

Trading floor of the Palace of Madrid Stock Exchange. Image: Madrid Stock Exchange  Biodiversity loss is recognised as a planetary emergency, as it is occurring at rates unprecedented in human history according to recent landmark reports on the state of global biodiversity and ecosystem services and global risks. Given the increasing focus on biodiversity, public policies at national, regional and global scale, as well as the investment community and sustainability-oriented customers are demanding more transparency from business sector in terms of biodiversity-related issues disclosure and reporting.  What is the situation of the Ibex 35 listed companies in this regard? To what extent is biodiversity a relevant or potentially relevant issue for them? How are they responding to the risks posed by their dependencies and impacts on biodiversity? To shed light on these questions, Ecoacsa Reserva de Biodiversidad and the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) have signed a Collaborative Project Agreement (CAP) to assess the performance of all IBEX 35 with respect to the integration of biodiversity into their operations. The aim of this project is to evaluate the level of awareness of the importance of biological diversity incorporation into activities, plans and strategies of the selective Ibex 35, to identify key gaps and strengths with regards to biodiversity risk and performance disclosure in Spain. Ecoacsa will conduct the assessment along with Polytechnic University of Madrid according to a transparent methodology developed by the EWT, based on publicly available data, including corporate websites, annual reports such us annual integrated reports and sustainability reports. This initiative takes place within the Biodiversity Disclosure Project (BDP), supported by the National Biodiversity and Business Network (NBBN), which was established by the EWT in 2013 and is member of the  Global Partnership for Business and Biodiversity (GPBB) of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). The Biodiversity Disclosure Project is a framework that provides companies with a practical avenue through which to consolidate and report annually on their impacts and dependencies on biodiversity a standardised and comparable manner. Ebro river landscape. Image: Pixabay.com Credible and unbiased information One of the BDP´s outputs is the Biological Diversity Protocol (BD Protocol), developed in close collaboration with a wide range of stakeholders and  designed as a comprehensive biodiversity impact accounting and reporting framework that can help produce the credible and unbiased information needed for various biodiversity-related applications, from site management to disclosure. The BD Protocol helps companies consolidate all their biodiversity impact information across their operations and value chains. This process involves several key steps, from developing and managing a biodiversity impact inventory according to the appropriate organisational and value chain boundaries, identifying and determining material biodiversity impacts to disclosing or reporting on an organisation’s impacts on biodiversity. The information produced is also useful to stakeholders, investors, policy makers and non-governmental organisations as it provides the evidence needed to make informed decisions. Improving the biodiversity disclosure of reporting organisations will enable benchmarking with peers across and within industries, pushing for continuous improvement to minimise risks, reduce costs and seize new opportunities. While the GHG Protocol Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard (i.e. the GHG Protocol) was the benchmark standard for the vision and structure of the BD Protocol, it is aligned to the Natural Capital Protocol. It helps provide biodiversity-specific guidance to measuring changes in the state of natural environment, by providing guidance on how to measure change in biodiversity components impacted by business. Context Biodiversity – the essential variety of life forms on Earth – is at serious risk with over one million species threatened with extinction and its continued decline in every region of the world, significantly reducing nature’s capacity to underpin economic activity and contribute to people’s well-being. This ecological crisis is widely recognised by landmark reports on the state of global biodiversity and ecosystem services (IPBES, 2019) and global risks (Global Risk Report 2020 and Nature Risk Rising by World Economic Forum) rating biodiversity loss as “the second most impactful and third most likely risk for the next decade” and calling for more effective action from all economic and social agents to conserve biodiversity. To a lesser or a greater extent, all businesses affect and rely on biodiversity, directly and indirectly, and the many key ecosystem services it provides, for example, in the form of nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, pest regulation and crops pollination, flood attenuation, erosion control, sustain agricultural productivity and many others. Biodiversity underpins economic development, but it is threatened globally and its ability to continue to provide the goods and services that supports economies and societies is failing. The biodiversity loss affects society as a whole, and in particular those companies that are highly dependent on the secure supply of a number of nature-dependent commodities and other resources that biological diversity provides. Understanding risks and opportunities associated to dependencies and impacts of business sector on biodiversity is increasingly recognized as a key sustainability factor for many organisations as they are explicitly referred to play their part in high-level global agreements and national and regional regulations by managing biodiversity better and reducing their footprint on it. Examples of the latter are the Sustainable Development Goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Aichi Targets of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 of the Convention of Biological Diversity (currently negotiating the post-2020 global biodiversity framework), and the European Union Green Deal.   By assessing the biodiversity mainstreaming performance of the 35 most liquid securities traded on the Spanish market, expected outcomes will provide a real picture of the materiality of biodiversity for Spanish businesses. This information will also help us to know whether biodiversity remains a challenge across the largest Spanish companies by market capitalisation or key progress has been made and can provide direction and momentum to other enterprises at national and international scale. Joint press release download ...

This 2020, the protagonist of World Environment Day is biodiversity. In this infographic we collect some objectives established by the European Green Deal, the new EU Biodiversity Strategy and the zero draft of the new global post-2020 biodiversity framework of the Convention on Biological Diversity that seek to halt biodiversity loss and promote its conservation and ecosystem restoration. Click on the image for a better resolution of the animated infographic. Comparte Facebook-f Twitter Linkedin-in ...

During our involvement along with another experts in the second preparatory lab of the “4th edition of Madrid Cities Forum”, discussion of the organisation of this two yearly meeting was focused on urban renaturalisation and the need to increase cities resilience through Nature-Based Solutions. Some of the conclusions reached during debating are that cities are disconnected from natural environment and in many cases they are also detached from peripheral realities. This leads to the need of enabling an appropriate ‘strategic planning’ and efficient communication to “make progress towards a regenerative system” more similar to how nature works. Our Executive Director, David Álvarez, highlighted the key role that natural capital approaches and its associated accounting plays in the understanding the value that nature provides to cities. In this regard, he stated that work under way to develop environmental accounting models and growing or wealth indicators that go beyond GDP at European and global scales, to help people to understand the value of nature. David also emphasized that important training and dissemination work is needed so that the relevance that natural assets and ecosystem services that environment provides gets across to society and business sector. “ We are not talking about profound changes, but to have a range of basic knowledge to integrate biodiversity. Technical capacity exists and we know a lot so that what it is needed is the willingness to chage”, he outlined. Read the whole article published in Ciudad Sostenible (page 36). Comparte Facebook-f Twitter Linkedin-in ...

Pond containing plants by using organic networks and coconut fiber batts to control soil erosion, retain sediments and humidity to facilitate re-planting in Plataforma Central Iberum (Illescas, Toledo) Green Building Council España (GBCe), Ecoacsa Reserva de Biodiversidad and the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) have signed a collaboration agreement to work together to develop actions that promote sustainable building in Spain and at European level. They will cooperate by incorporating biodiversity-oriented design of business and industrial premises (BOP).The agreement is framed within the objectives of the EU LIFE projects LIFE Level(s) and LIFE BooGI BOP. The first aims to promote a voluntary assessment framework that will lead to increase sustainable buildings in the European building stock. Level(s) also encourages taking into account the life cycle of the buildings to address environmental and climate risks. The LIFE BooGI BOP project promotes BOP design as part of green infrastructures such as biotope corridors -specially in urban and periurban areas in Europe- that are also able to improve the well-being of individuals and society.Among actions that will be developed within the agreement, signing entities will cooperate organising training and awareness-raising sessions targeted at buildings maintenance staff, , architects, builders, developers, manufacturers or building, members of professionals associations and other experts from construction and building sectors.The content of these sessions is designed to inform, raise awareness and empower attendees to support biodiversity protection and its strengthening within their workplaces, while at the same time make their buildings and environments more sustainable, and enhance working atmosphere and employee’s´ well-being.Another common line of working, which is associated to GBCe´s certification tools, will consist in defining ways to measure impacts that the management of building and construction sectors has on biodiversity and ecosystem. That is, how activities from both sectors affect benefits that nature provides to society such us food, wood, fiber, clean air and water, carbon sequestration, soil stabilization and pollination, among others.Research is one of the cornerstones of both LIFE projects involved in the agreement whose promoters have agreed to cooperate in this field. Specifically, they will design activities both at national and international scale to develop methods which make it possible to value the positive impact of biodiversity on architecture in environmental, social and economic terms. The agreement is therefore seeking enhance Nature-based Solutions as a means of fostering sustainability in building sector.One of the objectives of the agreement is to collaborate with public administrations, universities, corporations practitioners, national and international organisations and associations in disseminating principles and good practices on sustainable design and construction of buildings.Synergies, knowledge and resources shared for achieving the purpose of the agreement are expected to help accelerate the transformation of the building sector towards a sustainable building.Objectives pursued by the framework agreement are aligned with the European Green Deal, which advocates for transformative changes in all of the economic and social spheres, including construction and building. The European Green Deal is aligned with the Paris Agreement on climate change and its aim is to ensure that Europe has a zero-emissions economy by 2050, and protects our environment to enhance individuals’ well-being and working atmosphere in businesses. In addition, it is an integral part of the EU strategy for implementing the United Nations 2030 Agenda for the Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Share Facebook-f Twitter Linkedin-in ...

Nature is essential to the future of the planet, but natural resources are being used up faster than the Earth can replace them. Through understanding and considering the risks and opportunities created by nature, businesses can make better decisions that benefit themselves, society and the planet as a whole.We Value Nature is an EU Horizon 2020 three-year campaign that seeks to boost uptake of the use of natural thinking, natural capital accounting, nature-based solutions and green infrastructure by businesses across Europe to make valuing nature the new normal. These approaches can contribute substantially to a sustainable and resilient economy, which is crucial in the context of the current ecological and climate crisis where environmental risks continue to dominate the global business and economic agenda.Considering the growing risk of climate change and natural disasters, there is a clear sense of urgency to integrate nature into the decision-making processes of the public and private sector accelerating the mainstreaming through different approaches such as natural capital assessment, natural capital accounting (NCA), Nature-based Solutions (NbS), Green infrastructure (GI) and ecosystem-based approaches.In order to encourage governments to take comprehensive action to reverse nature loss and restore the planet’s vital natural systems, the business community has a critical role to play in demonstrating that the safeguarding of nature makes economic sense, also in identifying the policies and mechanisms needed for global systemic and transformative change. To foster a sense of shared ownership over the agreements and outcomes, the private and public sector can benefit from pursuing joint action.We Value Nature is currently carrying out together with Ecoacsa a pilot project to identify opportunities to strengthen collaboration between the public and private sector through assessing the options, benefits and best practices of protecting nature, enhancing the functions of ecosystems and restoring degraded land in a specific nature area in the Mediterranean area, Cabo de Gata-Níjar (Andalusia, Spain), by reinforcing the integration of natural capital in decision-making processes.To identify different natural capital approaches that benefit local stakeholders from public and private sectors and society In order to achieve this, we are searching for case studies that demonstrate successful actions for valuation of natural capital, ecosystem restoration, nature conservation and the effective integration of ecosystem services approaches in decision-making. The case studies will be assessed and the most successful ones in terms of demonstrated leadership and results will be compiled into a publication of best practices to support interested public and private sector stakeholders to learn and replicate these actions.  Case studies that could be eligible should come from ecotourism sector, eco-agriculture, and agroforestry. Assessment of case studies Located in a dry and semi-arid habitat in the Mediterranean coastal protected area (in the stream southeast of the Iberian Peninsula in the most arid part of Europe) Extension: it covers 46,000 hectares, of which 12,000 hectares are in the marine zone to a depth of 60 meters Arid climate (conditioned by the proximity of the Sahara Desert and the influence during most of the year of the Azores anticyclone) Low precipitation rain (rainfall below 200 mm a year) Average yearly temperature between 15-22 °C Abundance of semi-arid plant formations with fan palms Together with numerous endemic species specific to the zone are many other species characteristics of Saharan flora In this area there could be found different protected species (fauna & flora) Intensive greenhouse agriculture and increasingly, the tourism and tertiary sector) Protection classifications: Maritime and Terrestrial Natural Park, Specially Protected Bird Area (SPBA), Internationally Important Wetland (Ramsar Convention), Geopark, Specially Protected Area of Importance for the Mediterranean (SPAIM) Selected projects will be assessed according to objectives, scope, level of ambition, impacts, and dependencies on natural capital, valuation (qualitative, quantitative, and monetary), lessons learnt, project funding, and integration in the decision-making process. We Value Nature will profile projects that demonstrate how fostering a mutual understanding of the different approaches to landscape restoration and collaboration and integration of natural capital in decision making and practice can enhance benefits for all stakeholders from public and private sectors and society. The focus will be on showcasing a variety of natural capital approaches that benefit local stakeholders from the public and private sector and that offer potential for replication and new partnerships between key stakeholders The selected projects will be included in a final report, which will be publicly available and presented in different relevant workshops and meetings in Europe. All case studies proceeding from the open call that are not finally selected will be included in a specific annex to the final report. It will consist of a list of case studies and proposed uptake as a natural capital case studies, in case they fulfil the requirements. How to submit a case study? Provide a short description of the project and the natural capital approaches developed including objectives, impacts and lessons learnt. This information can be shared on the basis of existing project documentation or via links to online information.Please submit your case study by email to jesuscarrasco@ecoacsa.com by the 3rd of April 2020Successful case studies to be profiled by We Value Nature will be notified before end of April 2020.Link to the call published in We Value Nature website.  Share Facebook-f Twitter Linkedin-in ...

Interview with David Álvarez, Executive Director of Ecoacsa El Ágora - diario del agua In this interview in el Ágora - diario del agua, our Executive Director,  explains how natural capital approaches addresses water protection, biodiversity conservation and climate change adaptation in a holistic manner, instead of separately. David also emphasises that natural capital thinking incorporates not only a vision of the impacts, but also a vision of the dependencies on nature, and in particularly it includes a value proposition. That is, why nature and natural capital is important to business and society.  This approach seeks to incorporate an integral valuation of impacts and dependencies, which is precisely one of the reasons why business are not taking natural capital into consideration. Large part of the business sector is not taking into account impacts that business operations have on natural capital, or what are their dependencies from it. In order for companies to be aware of the relevance that natural capital has for their business, the concept of "economic valuation" of the relationship between business and nature is incorporated. This allows to know how relevant is the relationship between business and nature in economic terms. During the interview, David also stresses that innovation has a key role given that natural capital does not stop being a transformative element, a new paradigm that requires research on what are the best valuation techniques, which tools can be used, or what new communication instruments are more adequate. He also points out that investment in natural capital has to be seen as an investment rather than a expenditure, and that thanks to climate policies business sector interest in biodiversity and natural capital is growing because organisations are realising that climate change and biodiversity cannot be dissociated. Comparte Facebook-f Twitter Linkedin-in ...

LIFE BooGI-BOP team visiting Plataforma Central Iberum family photo. Image: PCI How can nature-oriented company sites be implemented under Mediterranean conditions? This was one of the key questions that the experts from Germany, Austria, Slovakia and their Spanish hosts Ecoacsa and Polytechnic University  of Madrid (UPM) asked . While in Central Europe, flowering meadows or green roofs can be organised all year round, the low rainfall in large parts of Spain compels us to adopt other concepts. Concrete examples in Castille-La Mancha near Toledo in the south of Madrid show that this is possible. Plataforma Central Iberum is a logistics and industrial area with 350 hectares and it is the first industrial area in Spain to refer to the principles of sustainable development in Europe. The aim is to demonstrate an approach to the development of industrial areas that integrates important sustainability aspects, including all environmental impacts, and also takes into account climate change. The importance of water The central element is water, which, although generally insufficient, can fall in a few heavy rainfall events and then lead to flooding. Rainwater is therefore drained from all roof areas, about 100 ha, into large underground cisterns. Further water flows into a belt from an artificial wetland, which is fed from the cisterns over the summer and thus remains as a source of water for many animals even in the dry season. Wide avenues of up to 40 m are laid out between the company premises, traffic islands allow the integration of elements such as cycle paths, insect hotels, resting places or herb gardens and fruit trees. Other fruit trees, some planted with the families of employees of surrounding companies, help to preserve the biodiversity of the area. As a positive side effect, there are considerable savings in maintenance, as erosion and other consequences of heavy rainfall do not occur and larger areas do not need to be maintained at all. A further economic benefit is the settlement of international companies. Due to their sustainable orientation, these companies can fulfil sustainability reporting criteria from the outset. This is an important effect for marketing, which was not foreseen, but which now makes it much easier to sell the logistics areas and enables good prices. The residents are still a bit unfamiliar with the new design, which takes up the Mediterranean landscape much more and therefore dispenses with lush, year-round irrigated lawns. Finding a new design language here is also a task for the project partners from four European countries. LIFE BooGI-BOP partners Partners of the project are Lake Constance Foundation, Global Nature Fund e Institut für Lebensbezogene Architektur e. V. (ILbA, Germany), Amt der Vorarlberger Landesregierung —Abteilung Umweltund Klimaschutz (Ive)— (Austria), Ecoacsa Reserva de Biodiversidad and Polytechnic University of Madrid (Spain), and Ekopolis Foundation (Slovakia). Rainwater basin generated in Plataforma Central Iberum. Image: PCI Comparte Facebook-f Twitter Linkedin-in ...