The European Commission has launched a public consultation on the first two sets of criteria for determining which economic activities can qualify as environmentally sustainable, under the EU's Taxonomy. The EU's Taxonomy Regulation, which entered into force on 12 July 2020, will help create the world's first-ever “green list” – a classification system for sustainable economic activities – that will create a common language that investors and businesses can use when investing in projects and economic activities that have a substantial positive impact on the climate and the environment. ...

The continuous challenge in the search for sustainability represents an increasingly relevant demand in the management of companies. A group of Brazilian companies committed to moving towards a new sustainable economy have opted for the LIFE Certification to highlight the important role that the business sector plays in conserving natural capital. The LIFE Methodology and Certification have been adapted to Europe by Ecoacsa, and the first pilots will begin with leading Spanish companies next November....

The Spanish Green Growth Group has published 34 examples of green economy, a compendium of successful business cases aligned with a sustainable development model that contributes to competitiveness, job and value creation for companies and society as a whole. The document collects various examples of the 34 GECV members that represent a determined commitment to advance towards sustainability, decarbonization, the integration of nature into decision-making, the promotion of collaboration, innovation and the circular economy....

The EU B@B Platform has launched a new SMEs and Nature survey with the Capitals Coalition, We Value Nature and the Enterprise Europe Network. The objective of the survey is to better understand how SMEs consider their relationships with nature, what type of support SMEs require and how this support should be implemented....

In the framework of the EU Green Week, we will participate on October 14, from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. (CET), in a partner event  organised in collaboration with the LIFE Institute. During the webinar on the LIFE Methodology and the LIFE Key Europe tool we will address how this methodology helps organisations interested in promoting biodiversity conservation to measure, evaluate and communicate their actions in this field, as well as to establish a minimum performance that they must achieve according to their size and impact. In the aftermath of coronavirus crisis, there is a growing interest in deploying stimulus packages at scale to drive an economic recovery. This opens a window of opportunity for the design of strategies that integrate longer-term sustainability considerations, including solutions that boost the economy and generate positive environmental outcomes at the same time. These include conservation of biodiversity and the protection of ecosystem services that sustain the prosperity and resilience of countries in the face of crises such as pandemics. In this framework, interest in natural capital accounting is growing and there is a clear demand for methodologies that incorporate biodiversity and ecosystem services. The LIFE Methodology developed by the LIFE Institute of Brazil provides metrics that help business and financial sectors in this task. Specifically, it provides information on the importance of impacts on biodiversity, as well as support to communicate the positive environmental performance of the conservation actions. In addition, the LIFE Methodology also facilitates the identification of key gaps or improvements that can be implemented to obtain better results for biodiversity. Maria Alice Alexandre, Executive Director of the LIFE Institute, will use business cases examples to illustrate the application of the methodology and the positive results obtained. She will be accompanied by David Álvarez, Executive Director of Ecoacsa, who will detail how the process of adapting this methodology to the European context has been carried out. You can find more information here and the link for registration below. "LIFE Key Europe: Tool for business biodiversity management" REGISTRATION Comparte Facebook-f Twitter Linkedin-in ...

A total of 39 financial institutions and private firms, 17 think tanks and 6 governments have formed an Informal Working Group (IWG) to establish a Task Force on Nature-related Financial Disclosures (TNFD). The new TNFD is inspired by the lessons learned in the Task Force on Climate-related Disclosure (TFCD), and led by a coalition integrated by Global Canopy, the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), the Finance Initiative of the UN Environment Program (UNEP FI) and WWF. It has been created with the aim of create resilience in the global economy by redirecting flows of finance at scale towards nature-positive activities to allow nature and people flourish. The initiative is supported by financial institutions such as AXA, BNP Paribas, DBS Bank, Rabobank, First Rand, Yes Bank, Storebrand, as well as the governments of the United Kingdom, France, the Netherlands and Switzerland. Ecoacsa is among the additional stakehokders that have come together to create the Informal Working Group (IWG) with the objective of scoping the mandate and governance of the TNFD. Why a TNFD? Nature cannot wait, while we devote efforts to solve the climate crisis. Despite their material influence on society and economies, nature-related risks and impacts are rarely measured or disclosed, and are largely excluded from corporate and financial decision-making, regulation and supervision. The eventual outcome of the TFND is to make these risks and impacts visible and to increase the resilience of the global economy by reducing flows of finance that are negative for nature and people. At the same time, it seeks to increase funding that are positive, in alignement with the Paris Agreement, the Post2020 Biodiversity Goals and the Sustainable Development Goals. In order to avoid risks and find new opportunities, members of the IWG will work over the next two years to solve the reporting needs, metrics and data of financial institutions, so that they can better understand their risks, dependencies and impacts on nature. Throughout this period, it will be necessary for us to examine both the financial dependencies, impacts, transition and physical risks, not just on climate, but on nature´s assets and the ecosystem services provided to the business sector they invest in or lend to, which lost at scale could destabilise the economy. Launch of the TNFD is planned for early 2021 and will be tasked with devivering a framework to guide nature-related financial disclosure by the end of 2022. Until then, the IWG is already scoping the mandate and governance to ensure that the initiative contributes to avoiding the systemic risk and instability for markets and the financial system at global scale that are already affecting countries, companies and financial institutions around the world experiencing the consequences of the dramatic loss of nature and biodiversity. An informal Technical Expert Group will server at the direction of IWG to support the process and ensure a collaborative approach with other relevant initiatives. The TNFD partners are engaging with the Banks and Supervisors Network for Greening the Financial System (NGFS); the OECD and Multi Stakeholder Group on Business, Finance and Biodiversity, as well as the Natural Capital Coalition, Business for Nature and other organizations. Statements Biodiversity finance is the new frontier of green finance. Nature requires as much ambition and collective effort as it has been done for climate so far, and the private sector can play a crucial part in redirecting financial flows. We are convinced that the work of the Task Force on Nature-related Finance Disclosure or ‘TNFD‘ will accelerate the understanding of these issues and will ultimately lead to both a reduction in financial flows and economic activities that are harmful to biodiversity and a massive redirection of flows towards activities that are favorable to biodiversity. Bérangère Abba, Secretary of State on Biodiversity of France Habitat loss or degradation including deforestation that it is largely driven by the way we produce and consume food are rapidly undermining the natural systems on which our economies and societies rely on. Nature loss is a source of sytemic risk and instability for markets and the financial system but it is largely ignored in corporate and financial decision-making, regulation and supervision. Our economic behaviour has assumed the services that healthy natural systems provide, and on which our economies have been built, are infinitive. They aren´nt. We are pleased to welcome this collaboration with financial institutions, governments and other experts to establish the TNFD as a vehicle to swift finance away from destructive activities and toward a nature-positive economy Margaret Kuhlow, Finance Practice Lead and Interim Conservation Director, WWF International Changing flows of money from nature negative to nature positive is a fundamental ingredient in swifting global systems towards protecting and nurturing nature. Nature underpins world´s businesses. We desperately need nature —for air, water, food and for our health, inspiration, jobs, livelihoods, and for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Financial institutions and businesses have a critical key to protect nature. If we protect nature, it will pay us back with significant financial and material dividends. Midori Paxton, Head of Ecosystems and Biodiversity, UNDP An increasing number of financial institutions are stepping forward to address the twin crisis of climate change and loss of nature, and the strong apetite from the TNFD is further evidence of this momentum. Standarising nature-related disclosures will bring much needed efficiencies and transparency to financial markets. Eric Usher, Head of UN Environment Program Finance Initiative The launch of the Informal Working Group (IWG) for the TNFD is a significant step towards the goal of moving the global financial system from nature negative to nature positive. I look forward to working with the IWG members to shape and implement the Task Force that will help to make the transition possible. Madeleine Ronquest, Head Environmental, Social and Climate Risk at FirstRand Group Enterprise Risk Management Loss of nature is increasingly impacting business performance. Consumers, stakeholders and governments expect business to take actions which halt the loss of nature. WBCSD supports the launch of the TNFD which will help companies consistently and credibly assess, address and report their impacts and dependencies on nature. Diana Holdorf, Managing Director & Senior Management Team, World Business Council for Sustainable Development The creation of a TNFD is hugely important as it will lead to new ways of identigying, valuing and reporting on nature-related risks, as well as indentifying new economic opportunities to protect and restore natural world on which we depend, which is more pressin than ever.” Andrew Mitchell, Founder and Senior Advisor to Global Canopy Comparte Facebook-f Twitter Linkedin-in ...

More than 560 businesses from 54 countries, across all sectors and employing 9.5 million with revenues of US$ 4 trillion have called on governments to act now to reverse nature loss. Coinciding with the adoption of the UN General Assembly 75th declaration recognizing the urgent need for Member States to act to protect our planet and build back better, more than half million have joined our voices to urged governments to adopt policies now to reverse nature loss in this decade. We, signatory companies joining the Business for Nature call, recognize and commit to: Healthy societies, resilient economies and thriving businesses rely on nature. Governments must adopt policies now to reverse nature loss in this decade. Together let's protect, restore and sustainably use our natural resources. By signing this call to action members of the business community are hoping governments will hear us and step up their ambition levels in the run-up to Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) COP 15 scheduled to take place in 2021. The new post-2020 global biodiversity framework will be released during the COP 15 CBD in 2021. Join our collective effort by signing the call to action. Here you have further information, as well as the press release and the list of signatories. This list will be announced during key pre-COP15 CBD events in the followind months. Join the call to action Comparte Facebook-f Twitter Linkedin-in ...

Trading floor of the Palace of Madrid Stock Exchange. Image: Madrid Stock Exchange  Biodiversity loss is recognised as a planetary emergency, as it is occurring at rates unprecedented in human history according to recent landmark reports on the state of global biodiversity and ecosystem services and global risks. Given the increasing focus on biodiversity, public policies at national, regional and global scale, as well as the investment community and sustainability-oriented customers are demanding more transparency from business sector in terms of biodiversity-related issues disclosure and reporting.  What is the situation of the Ibex 35 listed companies in this regard? To what extent is biodiversity a relevant or potentially relevant issue for them? How are they responding to the risks posed by their dependencies and impacts on biodiversity? To shed light on these questions, Ecoacsa Reserva de Biodiversidad and the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) have signed a Collaborative Project Agreement (CAP) to assess the performance of all IBEX 35 with respect to the integration of biodiversity into their operations. The aim of this project is to evaluate the level of awareness of the importance of biological diversity incorporation into activities, plans and strategies of the selective Ibex 35, to identify key gaps and strengths with regards to biodiversity risk and performance disclosure in Spain. Ecoacsa will conduct the assessment along with Polytechnic University of Madrid according to a transparent methodology developed by the EWT, based on publicly available data, including corporate websites, annual reports such us annual integrated reports and sustainability reports. This initiative takes place within the Biodiversity Disclosure Project (BDP), supported by the National Biodiversity and Business Network (NBBN), which was established by the EWT in 2013 and is member of the  Global Partnership for Business and Biodiversity (GPBB) of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). The Biodiversity Disclosure Project is a framework that provides companies with a practical avenue through which to consolidate and report annually on their impacts and dependencies on biodiversity a standardised and comparable manner. Ebro river landscape. Image: Pixabay.com Credible and unbiased information One of the BDP´s outputs is the Biological Diversity Protocol (BD Protocol), developed in close collaboration with a wide range of stakeholders and  designed as a comprehensive biodiversity impact accounting and reporting framework that can help produce the credible and unbiased information needed for various biodiversity-related applications, from site management to disclosure. The BD Protocol helps companies consolidate all their biodiversity impact information across their operations and value chains. This process involves several key steps, from developing and managing a biodiversity impact inventory according to the appropriate organisational and value chain boundaries, identifying and determining material biodiversity impacts to disclosing or reporting on an organisation’s impacts on biodiversity. The information produced is also useful to stakeholders, investors, policy makers and non-governmental organisations as it provides the evidence needed to make informed decisions. Improving the biodiversity disclosure of reporting organisations will enable benchmarking with peers across and within industries, pushing for continuous improvement to minimise risks, reduce costs and seize new opportunities. While the GHG Protocol Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard (i.e. the GHG Protocol) was the benchmark standard for the vision and structure of the BD Protocol, it is aligned to the Natural Capital Protocol. It helps provide biodiversity-specific guidance to measuring changes in the state of natural environment, by providing guidance on how to measure change in biodiversity components impacted by business. Context Biodiversity – the essential variety of life forms on Earth – is at serious risk with over one million species threatened with extinction and its continued decline in every region of the world, significantly reducing nature’s capacity to underpin economic activity and contribute to people’s well-being. This ecological crisis is widely recognised by landmark reports on the state of global biodiversity and ecosystem services (IPBES, 2019) and global risks (Global Risk Report 2020 and Nature Risk Rising by World Economic Forum) rating biodiversity loss as “the second most impactful and third most likely risk for the next decade” and calling for more effective action from all economic and social agents to conserve biodiversity. To a lesser or a greater extent, all businesses affect and rely on biodiversity, directly and indirectly, and the many key ecosystem services it provides, for example, in the form of nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, pest regulation and crops pollination, flood attenuation, erosion control, sustain agricultural productivity and many others. Biodiversity underpins economic development, but it is threatened globally and its ability to continue to provide the goods and services that supports economies and societies is failing. The biodiversity loss affects society as a whole, and in particular those companies that are highly dependent on the secure supply of a number of nature-dependent commodities and other resources that biological diversity provides. Understanding risks and opportunities associated to dependencies and impacts of business sector on biodiversity is increasingly recognized as a key sustainability factor for many organisations as they are explicitly referred to play their part in high-level global agreements and national and regional regulations by managing biodiversity better and reducing their footprint on it. Examples of the latter are the Sustainable Development Goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Aichi Targets of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 of the Convention of Biological Diversity (currently negotiating the post-2020 global biodiversity framework), and the European Union Green Deal.   By assessing the biodiversity mainstreaming performance of the 35 most liquid securities traded on the Spanish market, expected outcomes will provide a real picture of the materiality of biodiversity for Spanish businesses. This information will also help us to know whether biodiversity remains a challenge across the largest Spanish companies by market capitalisation or key progress has been made and can provide direction and momentum to other enterprises at national and international scale. Joint press release download ...